Sudan, Egypt, Ethiopia Resume Talks Over Disputed Nile dam

Previous talks between Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia, have failed to produce an agreement on the filling and operation of the vast reservoir behind the 145-metre tall Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD)

Sudan’s water ministry says Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia agree to hold further talks this month on the resolution of their long-running dispute over Ethiopia’s huge dam on the Blue Nile called the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD)

On Sunday, all three countries held a new round of talks via video conference in the virtual presence of South African officials, as well as other international observers. The Union’s rotating chair is currently held by South Africa

Previous talks between Sudan, Egypt and Ethiopia, have failed to produce an agreement on the filling and operation of the vast reservoir behind the 145-metre tall Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), a hydropower project which broke ground in 2011.

Your Friends Also Read:  "Terrorist" attack leaves 2 soldiers dead in Niger -Interior ministry

“The meeting concluded … “

that this week will be devoted to bilateral talks between the three countries, the experts, and the observers,” Sudan’s water ministry said in a statement.

Talks will pave the way this week, “for the resumption of tripartite negotiations on Sunday January 10 in the hope of concluding by the end of January”, the statement noted.

Egypt fears that Ethiopia’s dam would severely cut its water share.

Egypt depends on the Nile for about 97 per cent of its irrigation and drinking water.

Sudan on the other hand hopes the dam will help solve its flooding issues, but has also warned that millions of lives would be at “great risk” if no binding agreement was reached.

Your Friends Also Read:  Boko Haram raid military base, kill several soldiers in Nigeria

Ethiopia says the power needs of its population will be achieved using the hydroelectric power produced at the dam.

It insists that this will not affect downstream countries’ water supply.

The Nile, which the world’s longest river, is a lifeline that supplies both water and electricity to the 10 countries it traverses.

The Nile’s main tributaries, the White and Blue Niles, make a convergence at the Sudanese capital Khartoum before flowing north through Egypt to drain into the Mediterranean Sea.

Leave your vote


All rights reserved. This material, and other digital content on this website, may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from News Central TV.
Your Friends Also Read:  Ugandan Government Meets on Kenya Maize Ban; MPs Kick

Contact: digital@newscentral.ng

Total
0
Shares
Previous Article

COVID-19: 40 Million South Africans to Receive Vaccine in 2021

Next Article

Zimbabwe Embassy in South Africa Scales Down Operations

Related Posts

Log In

Forgot password?

Forgot password?

Enter your account data and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Your password reset link appears to be invalid or expired.

Log in

Privacy Policy

Add to Collection

No Collections

Here you'll find all collections you've created before.