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Complete list of the Future Awards Africa winners2 minutes read

Held at the Federal Palace Hotel, Lagos, Nigeria, the award ceremony was hosted by Falz and actress Toni Tones

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Complete list of the Future Awards Africa winners
Photo credit: https://thefutureafrica.com/

The 2019 Future Awards Africa took place at the Federal Palace Hotel, Lagos, Nigeria on Sunday, November 24, 2019.

The award recognizes the achievement of young Nigerian talents, innovators, entrepreneurs, and community advocates doing great in their various fields.

As usual, the annual award did not fall short of expectations. This year’s edition was themed “Nigeria’s New Tribe”. It was hosted by hip hop artist and rapper, Falz and actress Toni Tones.

Here is the complete list of the winners:

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR ACTING

Timini Egbuson (32) – Winner

Bimbo Ademoye (28)

Bandele ‘Baaj’ Adebule (30)

Sharon Ooja (28)

Fatima Washa Abdullahi (26)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR MUSIC 

Teniola Apata (26)

Damini Ebunoluwa ‘Burna Boy’ Ogulu (28) –  Winner

Folarin ‘Falz’ Falana

John ‘Johny Drill’ Ighodalo (29) 

Sadiq ‘Wurld’ Onifade (32)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR AGRICULTURE

Emmanuel Maduka (24)

Chiamaka Ndukwu Theresa and Kenneth Okonkwo (25/25)

Uka Eje (29) – Winner

Divine-Love Akam (24)

Rotimi Olawale (29)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR ADVOCACY

Hamzat Lawal (32) – Winner

Bright Jaja (29)

Uchechi ‘Ucy’ Rochas (27)

Ifedayo Durosinmi-Etti (30)

Funke Adeoye (27)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR ARTS (VISUAL & APPLIED)

Arinze Stanley (26)

Ken Nwadiogbu (25) – Winner

Dipo Doherty (28)

Olarinde Olayemi Ayanfeoluwa (22)

Olabanke Subair (28)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR COMMUNITY ACTION

Abdulazeez Kaltumi (27)

Yetunde Fadeyi (27)

Kelechukwu Nwachukwu Lucky (25)

Tony Joy (27)

Akpobi Elvis (31)

Isaac Success Omoyele (28) – Winner

Stephen Teru (29)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR FILM-MAKING

Kayode Kasum (28)

Dare Olaitan (28) – Winner

Chinney Love Eze (31)

Rahama Sadau (26)

Uche Odoh (30)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR LITERATURE

Akwaeke Emezi (32)

Ijeoma Umebinyuo (30)

Lanaire Aderemi (20)

Oyinkan Braithwaite (31)

Otosirieze Obi-Young (25) – Winner

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR MEDIA

Peace Itimi (24)

Paul Alasiri (27)

Edirin Edewor (28)

Samuel Ajiboye (28) – Winner

Tosin Olaseinde (31)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR PROFESSIONAL SERVICE

Bukky Akomolafe (31) – Winner

Adesola Ade-Unuigbe (28)

Yinka Iyinolakan (30)

Onoriode Reginald Aziza (27)

Peter Tega Oghenejobo (32)

PRIZE FOR OAP (VISUAL & AUDIO)

Osato ‘EDK’ Edokpayi (27)

Huisaina ‘Dashen’ Usman (31)

Mayowa Ogundele – Adegoke (30)

Simi ‘Drey’Adejumo (21) – Winner

Sandra Ezekwesili (30)

PRIZE FOR PUBLIC SERVICE

Adetola Onayemi (28) – Winner

Ibijoke Faborede (31)

Moses Onalapo (29)

Dr Achama Eluwa (31)

Fehintola Ajogbasile and Judith Oguzie (27/32)

PRIZE FOR SPORTS

Al-farouq Aminu (29)

Georgia Oboh (18)

Eseoghene Oguma (21)

Samuel Chukwueze (23)

Israel Adesanya (30) – Winner

PRIZE FOR EDUCATION

Olaseni Cole (32) – Winner

Omozino Eguh (28)

Eyitayo Ogunmola (31)

Seyi Oluyole (27)

Farida Kabir (27)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR TECHNOLOGY

Chinedu Azodoh/ Adetayo Bamiro (29/32)

Zang Luka Bot (28) – Winner

Muhammad Salisu Abdullahi (28)

Timothy Adeleye (25)

Funfere Koroye (29)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR FASHION

Andrea Iyamah (26)

Derin Fabikun (29)

Tuboboreni Sandrah (28) – Winner

Osemwengie Victor Odion (31)

Kenneth Izedonmwen (29)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR BUSINESS

Adekunle Hassan (31)

Obi Ozor (30)

Chika Madubuko (30)

Olawale Ayilara (31) – Winner

Tiwalola Olanubi (31)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR JOURNALISM

Aisha Salaudeen (25)

Joey Akan (28)

Ayodeji Rotinwa (29)

Shola Lawal (25) – Winner

Kiki Mordi (28)

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY

Adah Clarence (30)

Yemi Ajala (31)

Praise Nnemeka (21)

Stephen Tayo (25)

Tolani Alli (27) – Winner

THE FUTURE AWARDS AFRICA PRIZE FOR YOUNG PERSON OF THE YEAR

Debo Ogundoyin (32)

Kenneth Udekwe (32)

Damini ‘Burna Boy’ Ogulu (28) – Winner 

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How young people are changing the African narrative

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How young people are changing the African narrative

For non-Africans who have never visited the continent, the perception of the second largest continent in the world has always been that of a place of impoverishment and raw savagery; a place ravaged by horrible epidemic and war. 

This is largely attributable to an agenda-driven western media which sell these bogus tales about Africa to their global audience viewing the world through their reportage. Sadly, some of our local media are also guilty of this disservice to the mother continent.

As much as Africa, like other continents have its challenges, the positive stories to tell about the continent far outweighs the negativity found therein. 

The good news, however, is that young Africans – the new generation, are striving to change the negative narrative of Africa through their excellence in different fields within and outside the continent.

These young Africans are pushing the frontiers of knowledge in their respective fields of interests, discovering new things and making landmark achievements. Whether in Technology, Fashion, Literature, Music and more, they are forging paths necessary for the sustenance of development in Africa. These crop of individuals are passing the message that Africa has a lot to offer the world through its rich human resources. What better way to be true ambassadors of the continent? 

Let us take a look at some of the young individuals championing the change of an age-long African perception in their different fields.

Technology & Innovation

Over the years, we have seen some of the most innovative minds in technology come from Africa. Notable figures like Philip Emeagwali who invented the world’s fastest computer and who also won the 1989 Gordon Bell Prize for an application of the CM-2 massively-parallel computer, Jelani Aliyu who designed the Chevrolet Volt,  Elon Musk, the founder of SpaceX, among very many others make this list.

One young African that is gradually making waves in technology is 35-year-old Jamila Abbas. Abbas is a Kenyan computer scientist and software engineer who is the co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of MFarm Kenya Limited. MFarm is an android application that Abbas developed to solve the challenge of lack of pricing transparency Kenyan farmers faced.

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How “African” is our modern-day storytelling?

The tune of today’s African literature may still be dictated by the finances of the West

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Photo Credit: KUER

African literature in its earliest stages (of recognition) was mostly “protest writing” with a tinge of history. Most of the books published by African authors at the time were, at the very least, reactions to the socio-political reality that pervaded the continent at the time.

Between the 1940s and 1960s, it was rare to stumble on texts that did not attempt to address the subject of colonialism. Peter Abrahams’ “Mine Boy” dwelt on South Africa’s pre-apartheid days, Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart” and “Arrow of God” were centred on narratives that focused on British incursion into Eastern Nigeria, and “West African Verse” (a poetry anthology edited by Donatus Nwoga) comprised poems from all corners of the continent that were large cries for freedom and calls for unity in the struggle to rid the continent of (direct) European subjugation. 

How "African" is our modern-day storytelling?
Photo credit: Poshmark

READ: Nigeria’s Chimamanda Adichie receives UN Global Leadership Award

The final two decades of the 20th century and the turn of the millennium ushered in what seemed to be new African narratives. Focus appears to have shifted from the themes of old, and African storytellers as well as poets have ventured into new terrain, unafraid to tackle the issues of gender fluidity, identity, mental health, sexuality and even Afro-futurism.

One art form that has majorly benefited from this paradigm shift is the short story. No longer seen as wholly inferior to the novel, short stories have slowly but surely assumed a pivotal role in influencing the direction of new African storytelling. They are compact, they are intricately woven, and they come with a huge sense of perspective. Short story collections like Chimamanda Adichie’s “The Thing Around Your Neck”, Igoni Barrett’s “Love Is Power Or Something Like That”, Chinelo Okparanta’s “Happiness Like Water”, and more recently, Lesley Nneka Arimah’s “What It Means When A Man Falls From The Sky” provide insight on the new flavour of African stories being told.

However, there has been the question of what (and who) influences the kind of stories being told by African writers. There have been accusations levelled against authors of this continent bordering on “pandering to the West”. Writers have been chided for dwelling too much on themes like poverty, war and all the other topics that the West perceives as “uniquely African”.

How "African" is our modern-day storytelling?
Photo credit: Kobo

READ: 10 Young African authors making Africa proud

The late Kenyan author and journalist, Binyavanga Wainaina, in his essay “How To Write About Africa”, satirised what Western observers usually expected from literary works authored by African. “Jumping Monkey Hill”, one of the stories in Adichie’s “The Thing Around Your Neck”, is a fictional account of a writers’ conference wherein the protagonist’s manuscript submission is panned by a white facilitator for not being “African enough”.

There is also the matter of how African writing is being currently funded. It is telling that The Caine Prize for African Writing, one of the highest literary honours in the short story category, was created in the United Kingdom. The Prize has provided a springboard of sorts to many promising African writers, but it has also been criticised for subtly reinforcing Western stereotypes of what African literature should look like.

In the words of Nigerian literary critic Ikhide Ikheloa, “the creation of a prize for ‘African writing’ may have created the unintended effect of breeding writers willing to stereotype Africa for glory. The mostly lazy, predictable stories that make the shortlist celebrate orthodoxy and mediocrity. The problem now is that many writers are skewing their written perspectives to fit what they imagine will sell to the West and the judges of the Caine Prize….”

READ: Late Kenyan writer and human rights activist, Margaret Ogola gets Google doodle

It has also been argued that most of the writers who earn critical acclaim are usually based abroad, and in discussions about African literature are rated a lot more highly when compared to their contemporaries who ply their trade indigenously.

How "African" is our modern-day storytelling?
Late Kenyan writer, journalist and author of “How To Write About Africa”. Photo credit: Africa Is A Country

It is hard to fault this argument, considering how modern-day literary darlings like Ayobami Adebayo, Oyinkan Braithwaite, Chika Unigwe and Akwaeke Emezi are all practising their craft in the diaspora. Again, this reawakens the debate as to whether African creatives have to go out of the country before they can earn some recognition.

These arguments go to show that African literature, to an extent, still draws some of its validation from the best. However, credit has to be given to platforms like Kwani, Chimurenga, Kalahari Review, Saraba Magazine, Brittlepaper and the Ake festival for promoting African writing as much as possible.

A lot of funding is needed to motivate and reward African storytellers, and while it is wished that there wasn’t so much Western financing, maybe the fact that stories are being told is some sort of consolation.

Related story: Nobel winner Mahfouz lives on in Cairo’s alleyways

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UNESCO adds Morroco’s Gnawa culture to list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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UNESCO adds Morroco’s Gnawa culture to list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity
(Photo credit: multiculturalkidblogs.com)

Gnawa culture, a centuries-old Moroccan practice rooted in music, African rituals and Sufi traditions, has been added to UNESCO’s list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

UNESCO announced this via its Twitter account, on Thursday, December 12, 2019.

Gnawa refers to a “set of musical productions, fraternal practices and therapeutic rituals where the secular mixes with the sacred”, according to the nomination submitted by Morocco.

Often dressed in colourful outfits, Gnawa musicians play the guenbri, a type of lute with three strings, accompanied by steel castanets called krakebs.

They practice “a therapeutic ritual of possession… which takes the form of all-night ceremonies of rhythms and trance combining ancestral African practices, Arab-Muslim influences and native Berber cultural performances. The tradition, which includes the veneration of Islamic holy men, dates back to at least the 16th century.

Originally practised and transmitted by groups and individuals from slavery and the slave trade”, today it is one of the many facets of Moroccan culture and identity.

Gnawa was popularised by a festival that started in 1997 in the southern port city of Essaouira. 

Until then, Gnawa brotherhoods had been little known, even marginalised.

Now, they attract waves of fans each year from across the globe to the Gnawa and World Music Festival in Essaouira that highlights a unique mix of musical styles. 

Gnawa groups “form associations and organise festivals” year-round, which enable the younger generation “to have knowledge of both the lyrics and musical instruments as well as practices and rituals” linked to Gnawa culture.

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