Connect with us

Featured

Flooding can happen anywhere2 minutes read

News Central

Published

on

Over the past few years, mother nature has changed its ways, because we changed ours. Homes and businesses have been affected by a combination of factors like increased rainfall and the resulting overflow from rivers, especially in coastal areas.

Even for those residents in flood-susceptible areas or riverine communities, marshy lowlands, the method and character of angry cloudburst during a flood, is problematic and fraught with imponderables that are difficult to predict.

At least 25,000 people have died annually since the 80s in Africa from flood with 11 million more affected.

Last year, floods in East Africa provoked massive flooding, landslides, and overflow of several dams across Rwanda, Kenya, Somalia, Burundi, Ethiopia and Uganda. In recent times, Tanzania has spent over US$2 billion annually to manage flood. Landslides from flood took tolls in West Pokot, Kenya where 54 people died.

In Cunene Province of South Angola, Heavy rains submerged homes and damaged properties worth billions.

Mozambique lost assets and properties to 2013 floods estimated to cost over a tenth of its GDP to the tune of US$500m.

Nigeria experienced one of its worst floods in a century in 2012 – properties worth about US$10 billion were destroyed. Borno State in North-Eastern Nigeria had its worst flood in 7 years displacing over 20,000 people.

In 2019, flash floods happened in Tunisia and Algeria as well.

How ready is your community?

Homes may flood from prolonged rain over a long period of time. Internal issues like sewage leak, plumbing failure or extreme weather conditions, water-control structures like dams or levees may fall apart with devastating consequences.

Communities must pursue building approaches to withstand flood and erect structures above flood levels. In building homes and facilities, barriers should be created to prevent the ingress of floodwater into homes with high points using hard-wearing bricks or concrete or sandbags.

Encouraging tree planting across wetlands could create a wooded bulwark to break the speed of floods, check river overflow and arrest deforestation.

Farming or agrarian communities prone to flood may, with the assistance of local authorities, build flood storage reservoirs to hold back floodwater, collect excess rain and runoffs. Such reservoirs may be channelled to farms for irrigation purposes.

Copyright News Central

All rights reserved. This post and other digital content on this website may not be reproduced, published, broadcasted, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from News Central.

Tell your story the right way

Have you witnessed a news worthy event? Want to become our citizen journalist and tell your own stories?

Send your stories to us or contact us via:
Email: Click to email us
Social media: Twitter and Facebook @NewsCentralTV
WhatsApp: Text or call +234 901 190 0000 .

New stories delivered to your phone

Click here to have news stories delivered to your phone or mail. You can also share your stories with us. Join our mailing list here.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Entertainment

Kenyan ‘Softie’ to premiere in Sundance Film Festival

The subject of the film, Boniface Mwangi won the CNN Africa Journalist of the year award in 2008 .

Published

on

Boniface Mwangi’s feature documentary, Softie is set to screen at the Sundance Film Festival in New York on Saturday, January 25. 

Titled after the sociopolitical activist’s childhood nickname, the 96-minute film highlights his lesser-known struggles and accomplishments.

The 2020 Sundance Film Festival will take place from January 23 to February 2, 2020.

Softie (Capital FM)

Based in Nairobi, Sam Soko has engaged in civic literacy projects spanning across film, music and books. He is also the co-founder of LBx Africa, a Kenyan production company that service produced the 2018 Oscar-nominated short fiction film, Watu Wote.

The film ‘Softie’ is Sam Soko’s first feature documentary project. In 2018, it won the audience award for best pitch at Hot Docs Forum. 

The subject of the film, Boniface Mwangi won the CNN Africa Journalist of the year award in 2008 for his coverage of the 2007-2008 post-election violence in Kenya.

Copyright News Central

All rights reserved. This post and other digital content on this website may not be reproduced, published, broadcasted, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from News Central.

Tell your story the right way

Have you witnessed a news worthy event? Want to become our citizen journalist and tell your own stories?

Send your stories to us or contact us via:
Email: Click to email us
Social media: Twitter and Facebook @NewsCentralTV
WhatsApp: Text or call +234 901 190 0000 .

New stories delivered to your phone

Click here to have news stories delivered to your phone or mail. You can also share your stories with us. Join our mailing list here.

Continue Reading

Entertainment

Nigerian music industry to generate $86 million in 2021

This would be a huge leap from the $53 million revenue in 2018.

Published

on

The Nigerian Minister of Information and Culture, Lai Mohammed has projected that the Nigerian music industry is set to generate $86 million (about N3.096 billion) in revenue in 2021.

This was revealed at the Tourism Investment and Business Forum For Africa  (Investor) organised by the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) and CASA Africa in Spain, yesterday, January 24.

According to the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN), the forum is on the sidelines of the ongoing 2020 International Tourism Trade Fair which is held annually in Madrid. 

At one of the forum panels, Mohammed revealed that the industry’s revenue grew from $36 million in 2014 to $53 million in 2018. This however still falls significantly short of the fashion and design industry which recorded N4 trillion in earnings in the same year.  

He further revealed that digital music consumption contributed the largest portion of the revenue. This aspect of the growing market has significantly boosted the industry and provided unprecedented access for local artists.

Burna Boy is one of Nigeria’s most commercially succesful artists (Instagram/ burnaboygram).

“Although the art and craft sector largely consists of an unskilled workforce and individuals from remote and poor rural areas, it contributes to addressing some of the challenges that local communities face.

“It is also viewed as a cultural activity which represents the essence of the people’s way of life and serves as an integral part of the travel and tourism industry,” he said.

He concluded that given the impressive numbers the creative industry is being identified as a sector that could aid the diversification goal of the Federal Government

Copyright News Central

All rights reserved. This post and other digital content on this website may not be reproduced, published, broadcasted, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from News Central.

Tell your story the right way

Have you witnessed a news worthy event? Want to become our citizen journalist and tell your own stories?

Send your stories to us or contact us via:
Email: Click to email us
Social media: Twitter and Facebook @NewsCentralTV
WhatsApp: Text or call +234 901 190 0000 .

New stories delivered to your phone

Click here to have news stories delivered to your phone or mail. You can also share your stories with us. Join our mailing list here.

Continue Reading

Featured

Education: Humanity’s greatest resource

Learning can empower people, preserve the planet, boost shared prosperity and foster peace. Africa’s education strategy must align with the Global Education 2030 Programme. 

Published

on

At the heart of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) and many other human rights conventions is education as a fundamental human right. 

Yet owing to socio-cultural, religious and economic factors, millions of children and adults are unable to explore educational opportunities. 

Education in itself is the most strategic tool to lift marginalised populations out of poverty and meeting all the Sustainable Development Goals. 

As the world marks the International Day of Education today (24 January), which was declared by the United Nations General Assembly in 2018, we call on governments of African nations to commit more politically into education, drive inclusiveness by deploying education for peace and development.  

When children are denied their right to Education, their community is deprived of a sustainable future. This is why education is the most essential vehicle for driving substantial progress in health, economic growth and innovation which invariably offers a more environmentally resilient society.

Damning global figures show worsening inequalities between rich and poor families, between boys and girls and between rural and urban areas – over 600 million children and adolescents unable to read and do basic numeracy; three out of five girls in sub-Saharan Africa are unable to complete junior secondary school and some four million children and youth refugees are on the loose – out of school, roaming. 

Aside from being a fundamental right and tool for public good, education and relearning are humanity’s greatest renewable resource.

Malnutrition and food insecurity are products of poverty and inequitable distribution of opportunities, but it also suggests inadequate knowledge of nutritional facts and production methods.

Hungry children will not go to school. Children with failing health will not go to school. When they do, their performance is easily impaired by ill-health and poor nutrition.  Hunger-poverty-malnutrition-lower life prospects-joblessness-poverty. And the cycle carries on!

Through basic and relevant education, marginalised people learn more about health. They are better able to protect themselves and their children against diseases. Wellness among children improves if their parents have had quality education. Increased access to education can reduce troubled learning and contribute to reducing poverty.  

These educational poverty gaps between genders, the disconnect between the rich and poor families, and disparities between rural and urban areas are best closed by measured investment in social progress and human capital through education.    

Learning can empower people, preserve the planet, boost shared prosperity and foster peace. Africa’s education strategy must align with the Global Education 2030 Programme. 

To root Africa firmly within the core of the global knowledge economy, we need a paradigm shift towards functional education and training systems to meet the skills, innovation, creativity and competencies required to promote sustainable development. 

Copyright News Central

All rights reserved. This post and other digital content on this website may not be reproduced, published, broadcasted, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from News Central.

Tell your story the right way

Have you witnessed a news worthy event? Want to become our citizen journalist and tell your own stories?

Send your stories to us or contact us via:
Email: Click to email us
Social media: Twitter and Facebook @NewsCentralTV
WhatsApp: Text or call +234 901 190 0000 .

New stories delivered to your phone

Click here to have news stories delivered to your phone or mail. You can also share your stories with us. Join our mailing list here.

Continue Reading

Trending