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Three Endangered Rothschild’s Giraffes Die of Electrocution in Kenya

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The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has confirmed that three Rothschild’s giraffes have died after being electrocuted by low-hanging power powerlines at a Soysambu conservancy in Nakuru.

News Central reports that Rothschild’s giraffe are one of the most endangered species of the animal with estimate putting their population at less than 1,600 in the wild.

Kenya has about 600 Rothschild’s.

KWS said officials from the state-owned power distributing company, Kenya Power, would replace the poles.

“Preliminary reports indicate that the height of the electricity poles crossing Soysambu Conservancy are low, below giraffe’s height,” a statement read in part.

Dr Paula Kahumbu, the Producer and Host of Wildlife Warriors CEO WildlifeDirect, alleged in a tweet that the deaths could have been prevented if experts’ advise was heeded.

In another tweet, Kahumbu added that these deaths were not the first, and that they could have been prevented if expert advice had been followed.

“These power lines have been killing giraffes, vultures and flamingos. Advice from experts was ignored. RIAs [Risk Impact Assessments] are notoriously poor on many development projects. Sad that it takes these kinds of deaths to wake some people up!” she tweeted.

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African development

Africa’s Corruption Fight: What Must Be Done For Nigeria To Rank Higher?

Corruption is a multi-faceted problem, and it affects every sector of society, from the household level even up to institutions.

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Corrupt countries in Africa

Roughly 43% of Africans live in poverty while over $50 billion worth of stolen assets flows out of the continent every year. This is money that can be invested in jobs and businesses.

The African Regional Advisor, Transparency International, Paul Banoba joined Tolu and Olisa on News Central TV’s Breakfast Central to discuss the latest ranking.

According to him, TI arrives at their ranking by compiling analysis from experts and observers as well as the corruption experiences in the public sector of countries around the world. “Misapprioprated funds account for about 25% loss of development resources in Africa. One in two citizens of Sub-Saharan Africa reported paying a bribe for land services.”

Now, sub-saharan Africa scored 32% in the latest ranking, making them the worst performing in the region this year. Paul Banoba had this to say: The average of 32% has been the same for so many years. It was 32% in 2017, 2018 and only changed slightly to 31% in years before. We do have countries above that average and some other countries below it.
At the bottom of the index, we have contries like Sudan and Somalia. We also have countries rebuilding their independence from the scracth, countries with civil unrest, pockets of destabilisation and all sorts of insurgents like in the case of Nigeria.

So what is Seychelles doing right to have been ranked the least corrupt country in Africa? Banoba responded: “The right laws are in place, followed by institutions to fight against corruption. These institutions have the right resources, capacities, and independence to do their work. We have a clear separation of powers in countries like Seychelles, Botswana, as well as functional institutions and laws. Plus in terms of their responsibility to their citizens, they have high accountable levels.”

When asked about the impact technology has had on the fight against corruption, the Transparency International advisor explained that Technology plays a great role in availing accessible information. “Technology is advancing therefore anti-corruption needs to be equipped with the right technology to counter the advances of corruption facilitated by technology.”

In conclusion, he stated that no country is immune from corruption, as it is a global phenomenon. The country with the highest-ranking even scored 88%. But the absence of the right laws and non-implementation of laws weakens established institutions. The human beings that run these institutions seem to be immune from the laws, so it doesn’t have an effect on them. Corruption is a multi-faceted problem, and it affects every sector of society, from the household level even up to institutions.

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Conservation News

Capetonians Protest Covid-19 Lockdown

Dozens of Capetonians have flocked to various beaches across the city on Saturday in protest against the beach ban and current lockdown restrictions.

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Demonstators from Muizenberg, Fish Hoek and Blouberg thronged to the beach to call for the reopening of beaches and other public places.

No arrest had been made as at 2pm on Saturday.

One of the beach protest organisers Clay Wilson said, “I’m hoping that we get people to feel like they have a voice. There are a lot of upset people out there and we hope this helps to appease that.”

Wilson added that the protests will reach four major beachfronts – Blouberg, Camps Bay, Muizenberg and Plettenberg Bay.

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Kenya, Tanzania Plan to Conduct Wildlife Census

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Kenya and Tanzania are set to conduct a joint cross-border count of rhinoceros and other large mammals in the shared Mara-Serengeti ecosystem.

The census is one of the resolutions reached by a joint meeting dubbed ‘the Greater Serengeti Society Platform’

Chaired by chairperson of Tourism and Natural Resources Management Committee of the Council of Governors Samuel Tunai, it had in attendance key tourism industry players from the two countries.

The forum also deliberated on successes in conservation of the Greater Serengeti Ecosystem, as well as challenges and the interventions needed.

Attendees at the workshop facilitated by the European union included senior managers and directors from Kenya Wildlife Services, Tanzania National Parks, and Tanzania Wildlife Management Authority.

Others are Narok County, Maasai Mara game reserve warden, Frankfurt Zoological Society, Tanzania Association of Tour Operators, Grumeti & Friedkin and the Maasai Mara Wildlife Associations.

The meeting saw to the constitution of the committee tasked with the cross-border census. It involved Kenya Wildlife Service, Narok county government rangers, Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute, Wildlife Division of Tanzania and Tanzania National Parks and Environmental activists.

The aerial census seeks to establish the wildlife population, trends and distribution as well as foster cross-border collaboration on wildlife monitoring and management between the two East African countries.

Tunai said data from the census will be used for planning and preparing the management for possible wildlife security and human-wildlife conflict eventualities in the ecosystem.

Researcher Grant Hopcraft said the Tanzanian government has moved about 8,000 persons out of the Speke Game Controlled Area in a bid to conserve Serengeti’s ecosystem as it faces shortfalls in rainfall.

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