Connect with us

Business News

Uganda, Tanzania Sign Oil Pipeline Agreement2 minutes read

Published

on

Uganda and Tanzania have signed the intergovernmental agreement on the 1,445km long pipeline system of the East Africa Crude Oil Pipeline (EACOP) project.

The pipeline will transport crude oil from Uganda’s oil fields in Hoima to the port of Tanga. The pipeline will pass through Tanzania.

The signing ceremony was presided over by President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni and Tanzania’s John Pombe Magufuli at Chato district in the Geita region of Northern Tanzania.

It follows a similar agreement that Uganda and Total signed on the pipeline last week.

Ugandan President, Museveni, arrived Tanzania on a one-day working visit on Sunday. He was received by his counterpart and the country’s energy minister, Mary Goretti Kitutu; Attorney General William Byaruhanga and Uganda’s Ambassador to Tanzania Richard Kabonero among others.

Kitutu and Tanzania’s energy minister Medad Kalemani jointly signed the agreement between Uganda and Tanzania.

Uganda discovered crude oil reserves estimated at 6 billion barrels in the Albertine rift basin near the border with the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2006. However, commercial production was delayed partly because of a lack of infrastructure.

The agreement has now cleared the way for the construction of 1,445km long pipeline that will transport crude oil from Uganda’s oil fields in Hoima, to the port of Tanga.

Speaking at the event, Museveni said that the project has to begin with immediate effect for the people of the two countries to start enjoying the resources.

He added that the project is set to exploit 6.5 billion barrels of oil which is 40% of the total oil in the Albertine oil zone.

Museveni revealed that there had been long debates and negotiations between Uganda and other stakeholders on the amount of tax and other expenses, which delayed the commencement of the project.

To allow the timely commencement of the project, Museveni said that Uganda had to forego a total of $800m in revenue that was to be collected from the project for the next 25 years.

“Since it’s a new area, we decided to use the small area from where we will also be able to learn more for the sake of doing better in the next project,” he said.

According to Museveni, the project will also make fuel cheaper hence fostering the aviation industry, whereby regional airlines will get cheaper jet fuel.

In his remarks, President Magufuli revealed that Tanzania will earn sh7.5trillion and create more than 15,000 jobs over the next 25 years, or more from the project.

Magufuli said that the project implementation will open up the region for further opportunities for trade and in turn fast track socio-economic development.

He commended President Museveni, the government, and the people of Uganda for working closely together to have this project reach this stage.

Business News

COVID-19: Nigeria’s ICPC Discovers School Feeding Funds In Private Accounts

Published

on

An anticorruption agency in Nigeria has discovered over N5 billion in private hands. The head of Nigeria’s Independent Corrupt Practices and other Related Offences Commission (ICPC), Professor Bolaji Owasanoye, disclosed that the agency found N2.67bn meant for the school feeding programme in private accounts. An additional N2.5billion was found in the accounts of a deceased staff of the ministry of Agriculture.

Other things were discovered from the ministry such as 25 plots of land, 18 buildings and 12 business premises. All illegally diverted to private hands.

The professor of law made the announcement in Abuja. He was speaking second National Summit on Diminishing Corruption in the Public Sector, which was organised in collaboration with the Office of the Secretary of the Government of the Federation.

The summit had the theme, ‘Together against corruption’, also included the launch of the National Ethics and Integrity Policy.

He explained further that between January and August 2020, investigations revealed that Open Treasury Portal showed that of 268 ministries, departments and agencies (MDA) 72 had infraction totaling N90milillion.

Also, 33 MDAs gave full explanation for N4.1billion transferred to sub-Treasury Single Account while N4.2 billion that had been paid to individuals could not be satisfactorily explained.

The professor added, “We observed that transfers to sub-TSA were to prevent disbursement from being monitored. Nevertheless, we discovered payments to some federal colleges for school feeding in the sum of N2.67bn during lockdown when the children are not in school, and some of the money ended up in personal accounts.”

In continuation of the agencies investigation called Constituency Tracking Initiative from last year, the ICPC also reviewed constituency and executive project. In all, 722 projects with a threshold of N100m (490 ZIP and 232 executive) were tracked across 16 states. He said the commission had special attention to track projects in agriculture, water resources, power, education and health.

The Constituency Tracking Initiative is meant to investigate fraudulent procedure and practices in the award of contracts for constituency and executive projects. And to make recoveries on projects or contracts confirmed to have been inflated or in which contractors under-performed or did not perform at all. The professor explained that projects tracked at phase one were selected by the steering committee comprising Budget Office, Office of Accountant-General of the Federation, Bureau of Public Procurement, Media, CSOs and the Nigerian Institute of Quantity Surveyors.

The ICPC helmsman said the 2020 exercise showed some improvement in project delivery, but the commission was faced with many challenges.

In details, Owasanoye said, “We discovered that a number of projects described in the budget as ongoing were new projects.”

“We discovered that projects are recommended for communities that do not need them. Such projects are abandoned, in spite of the huge sums appropriated for them.”

“We discovered that projects were sited in private houses on private land thus appropriating common assets to personal use and totally denying communities expected to benefit,” he adds.

The chairman said that the commission’s effort had forced 59 contractors handling projects worth N2.25 billion, back to sites, while it recovered and returned to beneficiaries assets worth about N700 million and cash of almost N200 million.

Owasanoye, said that the commission would, in future, prosecute false description of projects as ongoing, in accordance with extant rules. All affected projects have been listed in the ICPC’s Interim Report for 2020.

Continue Reading

West Africa Business News

Dutch’s FrieslandCampina WAMCO Acquires Dairy Business In Nigeria

Published

on

Dutch owned multinational dairy products company, FrieslandCampina WAMCO, says it has completed the purchase of Nutricima’s dairy business in Nigeria.

Mrs Ore Famurewa, Executive Director, Corporate Affairs, FrieslandCampina WAMCO Nigeria, disclosed this in a statement on Tuesday in Lagos.

Famurewa said that FrieslandCampina and PZ Cussons signed an agreement regarding the acquisition in March, noting that Nutricima’s dairy business would be integrated into FrieslandCampina WAMCO Nigeria PLC.

“FrieslandCampina WAMCO has acquired the company’s production facility in Ikorodu, Lagos State, as well as the brand’s Olympic, Coast and Nunu milk products; a range of powdered, evaporated and ready to drink milk products.

“These brands have a good presence across the Nigerian dairy market,” Famurewa said.

Famurewa said that the acquisition underlines FrieslandCampina WAMCO’s continued commitment to contribute to the development of the Nigerian dairy sector.

She added that the acquisition satisfies the need for additional production capacity for FrieslandCampina WAMCO to meet the growing demand for locally produced evaporated and powdered milk by Nigerian consumers.

“Having fulfilled all requirements including requisite shareholders and regulatory approvals, FrieslandCampina WAMCO has commenced operations at the newly acquired plant,” she said.

Famurewa in the statement quoted Roel van Neerbos, President, FrieslandCampina Consumer Dairy, as saying, “FrieslandCampina WAMCO has been a key player in Nigeria since 1954. With this acquisition, we demonstrate our strong commitment to Nigeria and its dairy market.”

Ben Langat, Managing Director, FrieslandCampina WAMCO Nigeria, added: “It is our mission to bring affordable and attainable quality dairy products to all Nigerians and meet the growing demand. That’s why we are pleased with this acquisition.”

FrieslandCampina WAMCO Nigeria is an affiliate of Royal FrieslandCampina of The Netherlands, one of the largest dairy cooperatives in the world.

It is the maker of Peak and Three Crowns brands of milk in Nigeria.

Continue Reading

Business News

Nigeria’s Central Bank Admits Financial Inclusion Failure.

Published

on

Financial inclusion in Nigeria has missed its target. This has been confirmed in a report from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) and the Enhancing Financial Innovation & Access (EFinA) titled ‘Assessment of women’s financial inclusion in Nigeria’ for December 2019. According to the report, Nigeria’s financial exclusion stands at 36% for women and 24% for men. The report adds that, ‘The relative gender gap related to financial inclusion is 20-30%, placing Nigeria below its peers.’

It further states that, ‘Since 2012, although women’s exclusion has dropped, the gender gap has grown, revealing that men’s inclusion has improved more rapidly than women’s.’ The CBN launched the National Financial Inclusion Strategy (NFIS) in 2012 to reduce financial exclusion to 20% of the adult population. This has not been achieved.

It has been an uphill task for years. The main reason has been linked to literacy rates and information. Literacy on the part of the people and information or lack of it on the part of the financial institutions tasked with informing people about the services they offer. And the recently, unforeseen socioeconomic factors such as recession (in 2016 and is hovering around the nation again due to the economic impact of COVID-19), the precarious security situation in parts of northern Nigeria, and other factors such as slow uptake of digital financial services.

What is financial inclusion?
Financial Inclusion according to the Central Bank of Nigeria is a state where financial services are delivered by a range of providers, mostly the private sector, to reach everyone who could use them. Specifically, it means a financial system that serves as many people as possible in a country.

EfinA has already proved that many Nigerians do not have bank accounts or access to formal financial services. EFinA stated in its 2012 survey of Nigeria that 34.9 million adults representing 39.7% of the adult population were financially excluded. Only 28.6 million adults were banked, representing 32.5% of the adult population.

High levels of financial exclusion pose two major threats to economies:
Losing opportunities for business growth. In the absence of finance, people who are not connected with the formal financial system lack opportunities to maximise their income and expand their businesses.

The country’s economic growth could be stifled. Vast unutilized resources, in the form of money in the hands of people who are in the informal sector could limit a country’s economic growth potential.

What is Nigeria losing? Billions of Naira notes have and still are being circulated through the informal sector and this harms the country’s economic growth and development. The unbanked sector could considerably increase the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of Nigeria.

The EFInA survey in Nigeria 2012 revealed that 23.0 million adults save money at home. The report explained that, if 50.0% of people saved N1,000 every month with a bank, then up to N138 billion could be incorporated into the formal financial sector every year.

The opportunity for the private sector.

Providing financial products and services to the low-income population represents a large business opportunity for the private sector. Providers of financial products and services should develop innovative products and services that better suit the needs of the low-income unbanked and under-banked population.

Accessibility to more fintech services was heightened by the economic squeeze, inactivity, the lockdown imposed to curb the pandemic itself. Also, the CBN granting more licenses to Telco’s could insure the previously unbanked become truly financially inclusive.

Continue Reading

Trending