For more Nigerian women, family planning is power

Nigeria’s population is expected to leap from 190 million today to 410 million by 2050
Young girls arrive at the Bada Primary Health Centre in lagos for the “9ja Girls” programme on November 11, 2018. – The “9ja Girls” is a program aimed at helping young Nigerian girls prepare for adulthood through educational programs and family planning. Run by the US-based non-profit organisation Populations Services International, the 9ja Girls centre makes condoms, the pill and hormonal implants freely available. (Photo by STEFAN HEUNIS / AFP)

Modupe Adegbite’s grandfather had 22 children, while her father had nine. At the age of just 19, she has decided she wants no more than four.

“Why do you have so many children if you cannot feed them?” she asked.

It’s a question many young Nigerians will face over the coming decades in Africa’s most populous country, where a booming population combined with poverty, record unemployment and roiling ethnic conflicts have some fearing a demographic “time-bomb”.

“9ja Girls” notebooks lay on a table at the Bada Primary Health. – The “9ja Girls” is a program aimed at helping young Nigerian girls prepare for adulthood through educational programs and family planning. (Photo by STEFAN HEUNIS / AFP)

Nigeria’s population is expected to leap from 190 million today to 410 million by 2050 — and to almost twice that number again by the end of the century — according to the UN’s World Population Prospects.

Your Friends Also Read:  Nigeria's Oduduru runs second-fastest African time in men's 100m

That would mean that in just 30 years, Nigeria will be the world’s third most populous nation, behind only China and India.For young women like Adegbite, who was born in Bada, one of the poorest neighbourhoods in the economic capital Lagos, getting access to sex education and birth control can be difficult.

However Bada, does have a family planning centre, which opened last year.

Condoms, the pill and hormonal implants are freely available at the local 9ja Girls centre, run by the US-based non-profit organisation Populations Services International.

“Most of the girls here are sexually active at 15, sometimes 14 years old,” Naomi Ali of the 9ja Girls centre says.

“They start very early, whatever their religion. So they quickly become pregnant and they stop going to school.”

At first teenagers and young women in the area were suspicious, but Ali said hundreds now openly talk in the street about once taboo issues such as sexuality and romantic relationships.

Your Friends Also Read:  Mine explosion kills three Nigerian soldiers

All rights reserved. This material, and other digital content on this website, may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without prior express written permission from News Central TV.

Contact: digital@newscentral.ng

Total
0
Shares

Leave a Reply

Previous Article

Algeria relaxes its broad ban on imports

Next Article

Militia amnesty peace talks in CAR stumble

Related Posts
Powered by Live Score & Live Score App