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Manyama’s brace secures win for Kaizer Chiefs2 minutes read

The former South Africa midfielder opened the scoring after five minutes in front of a capacity 10,000 crowd at Makhulong Stadium

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Manyama's brace secures win for Kaizer Chiefs

Lebogang Manyama ended a 26-month South African Premiership goal drought by scoring twice as Kaizer Chiefs began the new season with a 3-2 win at Highlands Park Sunday.

The former South Africa midfielder opened the scoring after five minutes in front of a capacity 10,000 crowd at Makhulong Stadium 45 kilometres northeast of Johannesburg.

After Highlands had gone ahead with goals either side of half-time from Rodney Ramagalela and Namibian Peter Shalulile, Manyama struck again on 50 minutes to equalise.

An Eric Mathoho shot seven minutes from time which took a wicked deflection won the match for Chiefs, one of the most popular football clubs in the country but without a trophy since 2015.

“We have been through a rough patch over the last couple of years but I think today we showed what can be achieved and the team can only get better from here,” Manyama said.

It was an encouraging start for Chiefs at a ground where few visiting teams win as the Soweto outfit seek to put a disastrous last season behind them. 

They finished a humiliating ninth in the Premiership and were stunned by second-tier TS Galaxy in the FA Cup final.

Chiefs changed coaches midway through the 2018/2019 campaign with German Ernst Middendorp replacing Italian Giovanni Solinas.

“We had the edge over Highlands Park in quality and had to be patient,” said Middendorp, who has been resident in South Africa for more than a decade.

“The crowd was amazing today and this is the season where we have to play for our supporters. We attract many capacity crowds and then do not show up.

“But I think the situation is going to get better,” added Middendorp, who previously coached Chiefs a decade ago with minimal success.

Chiefs lie fourth after the opening round, behind Bidvest Wits, Orlando Pirates and defending champions Mamelodi Sundowns on goal difference.

Golden Arrows and Polokwane City were the other clubs to secure maximum points in the opening round.

Sibusiso Mbonani scored a minute before half-time to earn Polokwane a 1-0 away win over Black Leopards, who hired French coach Lionel Soccoia during the close season.

Soccoia replaced Maltese Dylan Kerr, who quit after complaining of constant interference from club officials. 

Arrows netted in the first minute of the second half through a Michael Gumede lob to edge Maritzburg United 1-0 in Durban.

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Southern Africa Sports

South Africa pulls out of race to host 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup

SAFA says it intends to focus on developing the women’s game in the country, alongside the South Africa Women’s Football League

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South Africa pulls out of race to host 2023 FIFA Women’s World Cup
Photo credit: Wikipedia

The South Africa Football Association (SAFA) will not be making a bid to FIFA ahead of Friday’s deadline to host the 2023 Women’s World Cup.

SAFA says it intends to focus on developing the women’s game in the country, alongside the South Africa Women’s Football League.

Last month, South Africa turned down an invitation from the Confederation of African Football (CAF) to be emergency hosts for next year’s Women’s African Cup of Nations tournament.

And the 2010 World Cup hosts – the only African country to host the men’s version of FIFA’s biggest tournament, also says it will not be biding to host another major international competition.

But recent problems facing the South African economy have been viewed as a key factor behind the move.

According to SAFA’s acting Chief Executive Officer Hay Mokoena:

“We resolved that as an association, we should not proceed with the bid. We want to strengthen our women’s national league first before we invite the world to come and play. Definitely, we will consider doing 2027 and we think by that time, we will have a stronger women’s league and a much stronger women’s national team”.

Earlier this year, the South African Women’s football team Bayana Bayana participated for the first time in Women’s World Cup which was held in France but failed to make it beyond the group phase.

An announcement is expected to be made in May on which country will host the 2023 Women’s World Cup, with Argentina, Brazil, Columbia, Japan, South Korea (who may have a possible joint bid with North Korea) and New Zealand so far still in the race.

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Namibia begins vote-counting after Wednesday’s general polls

The electoral commission has refused to state when provisional results will be released

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Namibia begins vote-counting after Wednesday's general polls

Vote counting is underway in Namibia after polling ran on late into the night in a general election expected to loosen the ruling party’s hold on power.

Namibians went to the polls on Wednesday for its presidential and legislative elections.

President Hage Geingob’s South West Africa People’s (SWAPO) party has ruled the country since independence from South Africa in 1990.

Though the ruling party SWAPO still enjoys massive popularity, President Geingob is predicted to lose votes to an independent candidate, Dr Panduleni Itula who himself was a member of SWAPO.

The breakaway candidate is particularly popular among the Namibian youths seeking for a change in government.

The electoral commission has refused to state when provisional results will be released.

But in the last election in 2014, provisional results were announced one day after voting.

By late Thursday morning, parliamentary results started appearing on the electoral commission of Namibia website – showing only four out of 121 constituencies.

Namibia begins vote-counting after Wednesday's general polls
Namibia incumbent President and Namibia ruling party South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) presidential candidate Hage Geingob (C) goes through voting procedures on November 27, 2019 in Windhoek, Namibia. (Photo by GIANLUIGI GUERCIA / AFP)

In 2014, Geingob won a sweeping 87 per cent of the vote, while runner-up and second-time runner McHenry Venaani racked up less than five per cent.

Streets were quiet in Namibia’s capital Windhoek as residents slowly went back to their daily occupations.

Although election day was peaceful, the voting process was slow and had people queueing outside for hours.

Polling stations remained open late into the night to process voters who had arrived before the 9 pm cut-off time.

“Frustratingly slow”, blasted the front page of the Namibian Sun. “Election littered with glitches.”

“Faulty EVMs, delays as Namibia votes”, echoed The Namibian.

Namibia begins vote-counting after Wednesday's general polls
Namibians wait to vote at a polling station during Namibian Presidential and parliamentary elections, on November 27, 2019 in Windhoek. (Photo by HILDEGARD TITUS / AFP)

Several voters complained about the delays.

“Everything went well, but it’s only that most people…were complaining about the EVM,” said 52-year old bank employee Alfred Siukuta, buying a newspaper on his way to work.

“We are used to voting normally, crossing out on paper and all that,” he told media, adding that he waited all afternoon and only voted after 11 pm (2100 GMT).

Some, like street vendor Eunike Ijonda gave up and went home.

“People voted until two o’clock, but me because I have small kids at home I can’t,” said the 38-year old, peeling onions behind her makeshift stall.

Ijonda said she stood in line for three hours without moving after one of the machines at her polling station broke down.

“The other year was faster,” she added.

“I am disappointed, I want the government to change and make voting two days.”

Around 1.4 million of Namibia’s 2.45 million inhabitants were registered to vote. Half were under 37 and around a third born after 1990.

Average voter turnout for past elections is around 76 per cent. 

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Southern Africa

Siya Kolisi: Trying For Greatness

The captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal.

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Siya Kolisi, captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal.

“Some people stop me in the street and others just come to the house to congratulate us on his achievement,” he said.

“It is unbelievable. The phone has also been ringing non-stop.”

Those were the words of Fezakele Kolisi after his son was appointed as the 61st captain of South Africa’s national rugby team, the Springboks. The captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal. Countless newspaper columns and hours of airtime are usually devoted to the role and the person holding the position.

If it is vacant, even more, media space is involved in discussing the implications of the vacancy and the possible candidates and eventually, the subsequent recipient. Take everything just described and multiply it by a million. The answer will give you a small insight into just how important the captaincy of the Springboks is to the people of South Africa. And how significant Siya Kolisi has become.

The story of South Africa is one which is well known throughout the world. A rich, beautiful, strategically located land with a proud African heritage. A nation whose land was stolen from its native peoples, who were subsequently enslaved and brutally worked to provide wealth and power for Dutch and British colonisers.

Siya Kolisi, captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal.
South Africa’s flanker Siya Kolisi (L) and South Africa’s fly-half Handre Pollard take part in a training session at Arcs Urayasu Park in Urayasu on October 30, 2019, ahead of their Japan 2019 Rugby World Cup final against England. (Photo by Anne-Christine POUJOULAT / AFP)

These colonial masters created an abominable political and social system called apartheid. It was a policy that governed relations between the country’s white minority and nonwhite majority and sanctioned racial segregation and political and economic discrimination against nonwhites. It had existed for centuries but was formally started and enforced in 1948 after the National Party gained power.

Under apartheid, the sport was also divided along racial lines. In a South African society, rugby was long considered a white sport, soccer a black one. And like most other institutions in South Africa, the South African rugby bodies followed suit. There was:

  • The South African Rugby Board (SARB) for whites only
  • The South African Rugby Federation (SARF) for “coloureds” i.e. people considered to be of mixed race.
  • The South African Rugby Association (SARA) (originally the South African African Rugby Board) for blacks. There was also the South African Rugby Union (SARU), which was a non-racial body, with a considerable membership. However, only the SARB had any say in international tours, and they alone chose the national team.
Siya Kolisi, captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal.
South Africa’s flanker Siya Kolisi takes part in a training session at Arcs Urayasu Park in Urayasu on October 30, 2019, ahead of their Japan 2019 Rugby World Cup final against England. (Photo by Anne-Christine POUJOULAT / AFP)

For over a century, the Springboks, as the national team of South Africa were known, were regarded as a symbol of white oppression of the native peoples of South Africa and a shining banner of the Apartheid policy. From 1891 when the first international was played, till 1995, the team did not have a single black player.

The world turned a blind eye and a deaf ear to the racial discrimination in South Africa until 1976, when the Soweto riots attracted international condemnation and 28 countries boycotted the 1976 Summer Olympics in protest, and the next year, in 1977, the Commonwealth signed the Gleneagles Agreement, which discouraged any sporting contact with South Africa.

In response to the growing pressure, the segregated South African rugby unions merged in 1977. Four years later Errol Tobias would become the first non-white South African to represent his country when he took the field against Ireland. A planned 1979 Springbok tour of France was stopped by the French government, who announced that it was inappropriate for South African teams to tour France.

From 1990 to 1991 the legal apparatus of apartheid was abolished, and the Springboks were readmitted to international rugby in 1992. But things really began to look up after the country was awarded the hosting rights for the 1995 Rugby World Cup, and there was a remarkable surge of support for the Springboks among the white and black communities in the lead-up to the tournament.

The black people of South Africa really got behind the team winger Chester Williams was selected for the Springboks, the only non-white person on the entire team. Nicknamed “The Black Pearl”, Williams was selected in the initial squad but had to withdraw before the tournament began due to injury. He was later called back into the squad after another player was suspended for a brawl and played in the quarter-final, scoring four tries. He also featured in the semi-final win over France as well as in the final against New Zealand.

Siya Kolisi, captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal.

Nelson Mandela, who had taken office as South Africa’s first democratically elected president a year earlier, had embraced the Springboks — long a symbol of repression to most nonwhites — signalling that there was a place for white South Africans in the new order.

Wearing a Springboks jersey and cap, Mandela visited the players in the locker room before they took the field in the final where they defeated the All Blacks 15-12. The image of Madiba lifting the trophy with Francois Pienaar, the team’s Afrikaaner captain, at Johannesburg’s Ellis Park Stadium was a poignant one. But one that masked some still-festering racial sores in the country’s rugby fraternity.

Instead of the victory accelerating racial integration in the Springboks, things stagnated. Twelve years later when the team won their second World Cup, there were only two black players. But today, things are much different. In the starting XV that beat Wales in the semi-final of the 2019 Rugby World Cup, there were six black players: wingers S’busiso Nkosi and Makazole Mapimpi, centre Lukhanyo Am, prop Tendai Mtawarira, hooker Bongi Mbonambi, and captain Siya Kolisi. Of Rassie Erasmus’s squad of 31, 11 are black.

Kolisi represents a poignant bridge between the dark past and the brighter future of South Africa. Born on June 16 1991, one day before the repeal of apartheid, Kolisi has overcome a humble background in the poor township of Zwide, just outside Port Elizabeth on the Eastern Cape, where he was brought up by his grandmother, who cleaned kitchens to make ends meet. At the age of 12, he impressed scouts at a youth tournament in Mossel Bay and was offered a scholarship at Grey Junior in Port Elizabeth. He was subsequently offered a rugby scholarship to the prestigious Grey High School. But tragedy struck when he was 15 when his mother died and his grandmother shortly afterwards.

He made his Springbok debut on 15 June 2013 against Scotland at the Mbombela Stadium in Nelspruit becoming the 851st player in the history of the team. He replaced the injured Arno Botha in the 5th minute and was named as Man of the Match as his side won 30–17. 9 further substitute appearances followed during the 2013 international season as he firmly established himself as a regular member of the national squad.

Kolisi played two matches in the 2015 Rugby World Cup, against Japan and Samoa. He was selected as the new captain of the Springboks on 28 May 2018, becoming the team’s first black captain in its 127-year history. Bryan Habana, former Springbok and of mixed race, praised Kolisi’s appointment saying “It’s a monumental moment for South African rugby and a moment in South African history.” His appointment has been well received by all his teammates. Both white and black alike.

But despite everything he has achieved, Kolisi is still said to be very humble and grounded. “His story is unique,” Hanyani Shimange, former Springboks prop, told BBC Radio 5 Live’s Rugby Union Weekly podcast.

“Previous generations of black rugby players were not given the same opportunities, purely because of South Africa’s laws. He’s living the dream of people who weren’t given the same opportunities as him.

“He’s grabbed those opportunities. He’s a good man, a humble individual.

“He’s got a lot of time for people, probably too much time in some instances. But he’s the same Siya he was six years ago. He loves rugby, and the team loves him.”

Siya Kolisi, captaincy of sports teams all over the world is a big issue and a big deal.
South Africa’s flanker Siya Kolisi (L) and South Africa’s prop Frans Malherbe take part in a training session at Arcs Urayasu Park in Urayasu on October 30, 2019, ahead of their Japan 2019 Rugby World Cup final against England. (Photo by Anne-Christine POUJOULAT / AFP)

Chester Williams died in September 2019 and his image was on the shirts the Springboks team wore for their 2019 World Cup opener against the All Blacks. This weekend, Kolisi will not need any reminding how much of a monumental occasion the World Cup final against England represents. His father Fezakele Kolisi will be in the crowd alongside 75,000 other fans. It will be the 50-year-old’s first trip outside South Africa and it could not come at a better time. Also in the crowd will be Cyril Ramaphosa, president of South Africa, who also grasps the significance of the occasion.

He has the chance to join Nelson Mandela and Thabo Mbeki as the third president of The Rainbow Nation to lift the trophy. But this time is remarkably different. His predecessors were handed the iconic Webb Ellis Cup by Afrikaaners. If South Africa wins, the records will forever show that it was two black men who lifted the trophy together. One born just as apartheid died. And the other who fought alongside other heroes to end the apartheid abomination.

Kolisi stands on the brink of history. He has the chance to go where no black man in history has gone before. But he will not go alone. Not only will ten other black men go with him, not only will his entire thirty-one man team follow him, not only does he have his nation behind him, but the whole of Africa will also spur him on.

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