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Sudan announces new sovereign council to lead transition2 min read

The council will be headed by General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan and a civilian PM due for announcement Wednesday

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Sudan announces new sovereign council to lead transition

Sudan’s generals and protest leaders on Tuesday formed the sovereign council that will steer the country through three years of transition towards civilian rule.

The body replaces the Transitional Military Council that took over from longtime ruler Omar al-Bashir when he was forced from power in April amid relentless protests.

The Islamist general appeared in court Monday, sitting in a cage to face graft charges — a sight that the two-thirds of Sudan’s 40 million inhabitants who were born under his rule could hardly have imagined.

The very first steps of the transition to civilian rule after 30 years of Bashir’s regime proved difficult, however, with disagreements within the protest camp holding up the formation of Sudan’s new ruling body for two days.

The names of the joint civilian-military council’s 11 members were eventually announced late Tuesday by the spokesman of the TMC.

The council includes five members of the military and will be headed by General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, who was already the head of the TMC.

“The president of the sovereign council will be sworn in tomorrow morning at 11:00 am (09:00 GMT),” TMC spokesman Shamseddine Kabbashi said in a short televised address. 

Burhan will head the council for the first 21 months and a civilian will take over for the remaining 18 months of the transitional period, which is due to end in 2022 with democratic elections.

New Prime Minister Wednesday –

Among the six civilian members of the new ruling council are two women, one of them from Sudan’s Christian minority.

The protest camp last week picked Abdalla Hamdok, a former UN economist based in Addis Ababa, as transitional prime minister. He will be formally appointed on Wednesday.

The transition’s key documents were signed on Saturday at a ceremony attended by a host of foreign dignitaries, signalling that Sudan could be on its way to shedding the pariah status it had taken on through years of devastating war in Darfur.

But amidst the euphoria celebrating the promise of civilian rule, unease was palpable within the protest camp that brought about one of the most crucial changes in Sudan’s modern history.

One reason is the omnipresence in the transition of Mohamed Hamdan Daglo, a paramilitary commander and one of the signatories of the documents, whose forces are blamed for the deadly repression of the protests.

Sudanese women, who played a leading role in the protests, have also expressed their shock at female under-representation in the transition.

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Africa records highest growth in use of modern contraceptives

Gains of 7 per cent were recorded in East and Southern Africa, against a global growth of 2 per cent.

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Africa records highest growth in use of modern contraceptives
Beth Schlachter (C), Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) Executive Director, speaks on the latest data and analysis on global progress in family planning ahead of the 25th International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Summit in Nairobi, Kenya, on Novemeber 11, 2019. (Photo by Yasuyoshi CHIBA / AFP)

The number of women and girls embracing modern contraception has leapt by tens of millions, with Africa recording the biggest gains, according to the organisation Family Planning 2020 (FP2020).

A new report shows that 314 million women and girls in 69 countries – out of 926 million of child-bearing age – now use contraceptive methods like condoms, pills and birth control implants.

The figures represent a gain of 2 per cent globally since 2012, while gains of 7 per cent were recorded in East and Southern Africa.

“The use of modern contraception is growing fastest here in Africa,” FP2020 director Beth Schlachter told a press conference in Nairobi, ahead of a global conference on population and development set to begin Tuesday.

FP2020, a self-described “global movement” founded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the British government, works with governmental and non-governmental partners to promote goals set at a conference in London in 2012. 

Specifically, it has been striving for 120 million new contraception users by 2020.  

“Family planning is a basic right,” said Benoit Kalasa, a representative of the United Nations Population Fund, citing the dangers posed by pregnancies that are too close together or that occur at a young age.

“It gives women the means to plan their life. They can stay in school when they avoid unplanned pregnancies. Women can space pregnancies to participate in economic activities.”

Of the 69 countries covered in the report, 41 are in Africa, 21 are in Asia and Oceania, four are in Latin America and the Caribbean and three are in the Middle East.

Schlachter said that governments seem increasingly focused on integrating family planning into health policy with an eye toward overcoming logistical challenges and cultural and religious barriers.

“In many places, even if you resolve things like funding of family planning or supply chain, unless you also work with communities and women to actually understand what contraception is, there will be a barrier to uptake.”

This week’s International Conference on Population and Development in Nairobi is not without controversy. 

On Monday around 100 supporters of a Catholic organisation demonstrated against the conference, which will focus on demographics and reproductive rights.  

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Victoire Ingabire launches new political party in Rwanda

Rwandan opposition leader Victoire Ingabire announced Saturday she was launching a new political party

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Victoire Ingabire launches new political party

Rwandan opposition leader Victoire Ingabire announced Saturday she was launching a new political party, hoping it will be allowed to operate in a country where the ruling regime has no real rival.

Ingabire’s previous party FDU-Inkingi, which she founded while in exile in 2016, was not recognised by the government of long-ruling President Paul Kagame.

She was imprisoned until receiving a presidential pardon last year from Kagame, whom she regularly accuses of suppressing freedom of speech, repressing the opposition and neglecting the country’s poor. 

“I am announcing the launch of a new opposition party,” Ingabire told AFP, saying it would be called Dalfa Umurunzi (Development And Liberty For All).

“This will help me to continue the mission that had been assigned to me by the FDU-Inkingi party,” she added.

“The political space in this country is very limited but we are ready to fulfil all legal requirements for registration and conduct our activities in accordance to the laws of the nation.”

She returned from exile in The Netherlands intending to run for president in 2010 as FDU-Inkingi’s leader.

But she was arrested, charged with terrorism and sentenced to more than a decade in jail during a widely criticised trial. She was unexpectedly granted early release alongside more than 2,000 other prisoners in September last year.

Ingabire, an ethnic Hutu, was accused of “genocide ideology” and “divisiveness” after publicly questioning the government narrative of the 1994 genocide of mostly Tutsi people that killed around 800,000 people.

Numerous FDU-Inkingi members have disappeared or been killed in mysterious circumstances over the last few years. The party accuses the government of brutally cracking down on dissenting voices.

One member was stabbed near the capital Kigali in September, while party spokesman Anselm Mutuyimana was kidnapped in March, his body later found in a forest. 

Although Rwanda is constitutionally a multi-party system there is practically no opposition, with most of the recognised parties supporting the ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF).

Kagame, the de facto ruler since his rebel army stopped the genocide in 1994, has been praised for bringing stability and economic growth to his tiny nation but often comes under fire for restricting political freedom.

He commonly wins re-election with more than 90 per cent of the vote.

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Springboks’ Rugby World Cup win springs hope of unity in South Africa

The significance of Kolisi lifting the trophy after a 32-12 victory over England resonated across South Africa.

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Springboks Rugby World Cup win springs hope of unity in South Africa

South Africans white and black celebrated wildly on Saturday and expressed hopes that the Springboks’ Rugby World Cup win, inspired by black captain Siya Kolisi, would bring the nation together.

The significance of Kolisi lifting the trophy after a 32-12 victory over England in Yokohama resonated across South Africa.

During the years of apartheid, rugby was clearly identified as the sport of the country’s white minority. 

Springboks rugby World Cup win springs hope of unity in South Africa
Siya Kolisi of South Africa receives Webb Ellis Cup after winning the Rugby World Cup Japan final match at the International Stadium Yokohama in Yokohama City, Kanagawa prefecture on Nov. 2, 2019. South Africa won the match by 32-12 to claim the championship. ( The Yomiuri Shimbun )

When Kolisi was made South Africa’s first black Test captain last year, it felt as if a barrier had been broken down — and in Yokohama on Saturday his achievement, and the team’s gradual racial transformation, was there for the world and millions of South Africans back home to see.

“Knowing where we come from as a country and to see Kolisi lift the trophy is absolutely monumental. It is really an incredible moment. Tears come to my eyes,” said Tshenolo Molatedi, a 26-year-old who watched the match at a Johannesburg sports club.

Joseph Mitchell, 50, a black actor, said the victory would have enormous significance.

“We are now 25 years into democracy and for the last 25 years, whites have dominated rugby and everything! It’s about time that people of colour can come forward to prove to the world that we are capable and probably better.”

The apartheid-era legacy meant that whites dominated the Springboks’ previous two World Cup-winning teams, despite only representing 10 per cent of the South African population.

Only one black player, Chester Williams, was in the victorious 1995 team and two, JP Pietersen and Bryan Habana, were part of the Springboks team that triumphed again 12 years later. 

On Saturday, black wingers Makazole Mapimpi and Cheslin Kolbe scored the two late tries that put the final beyond the reach of England, who were pre-match favourites.

“If you give black people a chance they can deliver and today’s win is a proof of that,” said Tsakane Mabunda, 45.

Seeing Kolisi hold the Webb Ellis trophy aloft brought back memories of the 1995 win when South Africa’s first black president, Nelson Mandela, presented the trophy to the team’s white captain, Francois Pienaar.

“Our father, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela, is smiling from the heavens today. Halala Siya Kolisi, treasure of the nation!” another of the heroes of the fight against racial segregation, Desmond Tutu, said in a congratulatory message to the team.

Read also: Siya Kolisi: Trying for greatness

‘Rainbow Nation’

A quarter of a century after the fall of apartheid, South Africa is still riven by racial tensions and deep economic inequality between whites and blacks remains.

But Tom Hammonds, 34, a white teacher, said the Rugby World Cup had united the country.

“We feel we are the Rainbow Nation. We have had a lot of problems in this country but sports always bring us together,” he said.

The ruling ANC also drew on Mandela’s legacy to express its hope that the World Cup win would bring lasting dividends.

“Sport is one of the biggest catalysts of social cohesion and nation-building, bringing together all South Africa’s people,” it said in a statement addressed to the team.

“Thank you for reigniting the Madiba magic – and making our Rainbow nation come alive.”

In Cape Town, the crowd watching the match on big screens erupted in joy at the final whistle.

“Look around, we have black, white, coloured … we are all united here today,” said Justin Johnson, a 35-year-old IT worker.

“The Springboks have done more for South Africa than any political party.

“I feel like in 1995 and even 2007 the Springbok emblem was still synonymous with the old regime and caused a lot of division. But today I think we have come full circle.”

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